Met announces the Mexican as the 1st female architect for the wing

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has announced that a Mexican architect has been chosen as the first woman to design a wing at the Met, as the museum is known

MEXICO CITY — The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York announced Monday that a Mexican architect has been chosen as the first woman to design a wing at the Met, as the museum is known.

The Met said in a statement Monday that Mexican architect Frida Escobedo had been selected to design the refurbishment of the Met’s modern and contemporary galleries, known as the Oscar L. Tang and HM Agnes Hsu-Tang Wing.

The newly redesigned wing of the iconic Manhattan museum will house modern and contemporary art, as well as photographs, drawings and prints.

The Met has sought to revamp the current modern and contemporary galleries for over a decade. The project will create 80,000 square feet of galleries and public spaces at an estimated cost of around $500 million.

The museum said that “through flexible gallery spaces, the wing will emphasize the interconnectedness of space and time and suggest a non-chronological narrative.”

The museum quoted Escobedo as saying “The Met is one of the most culturally relevant sites globally, and it is an honor to be selected for this historic architectural reimagining.”

“The Tang Wing offers an opportunity to breathe new life into museum art from the 20th and 21st centuries; to celebrate the dynamics we can find in art from different eras, geographies and ideologies,” Escobedo wrote.

Escobedo founded a group of architects in Mexico City under her own name in 2006. She gained wide recognition after being chosen to design the annual Serpentine Pavilion in London’s Kensington Gardens.

But she is best known to Mexicans for overseeing the renovation of the mid-century modern Boca Chica Hotel in the Pacific Coast resort town of Acapulco.

About Margaret L. Portillo

Check Also

Fall 2022 Arts Calendar

SEE : Filmmaker When Leon Vitali passed away last month, he left behind a largely …