Some remember the memories of the demolition of the old Franklin High School / High School

Sander said the bricks from the facade of the old junior high school building will be set aside for residents and alumni to pick up during the demolition process. He said the bricks will be piled up in front of the bus garage.

Sander told the Dayton Daily News that “Buying land gives us the opportunity to grow if the expected increase in enrollment in the district requires us to expand. For now, we’ll be cleaning up the properties and using the space as a training ground.

Legend

On Wednesday, a team from Green City Demolition is working on demolishing the southeast corner of Franklin Junior High School. The century-old building is demolished to make way for the new Franklin High School campus. The demolition should be completed in early January. ED RICHTER / STAFF

On Wednesday, a team from Green City Demolition is working on demolishing the southeast corner of Franklin Junior High School.  The century-old building is demolished to make way for the new Franklin High School campus.  The demolition should be completed in early January.  ED RICHTER / STAFF
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On Wednesday, a team from Green City Demolition is working on demolishing the southeast corner of Franklin Junior High School. The century-old building is demolished to make way for the new Franklin High School campus. The demolition should be completed in early January. ED RICHTER / STAFF

Once the new high school is completed, the building on East Fourth Street will be renovated and will become the new college. The new high school is scheduled to open in fall 2023 and the middle school in fall 2025. The three new primary schools will be built on the current sites of Gerke, Schenck and Hunter.

The current Franklin Junior High Building opened in 1921 as the East Building and housed both high school and high school students. District officials said additions were made in 1932, 1948 and 1952. In 1969, the current high school opened on East Fourth Street and students in grades 10-12 moved to this campus. Grade 9 classes began attending the current high school building in the fall of 1982.

To exploreEngineers: Best and safest roundabout option at New Franklin High School, Community Park

Some former students who went to high school or college there said it was sad to see the building demolished, but times are changing.

“It’s sad,” said Class of 1958 Liz Buchanan. “I have a lot of good memories there. I understand that you have to go ahead and go forward, but a another school will not last 100 years. Certainly not. “

Buchanan always keeps an eye out for his classmates who meet every year in addition to the class reunion every five years.

“I’m already getting calls for bricks,” she said. “It’s hard to believe it’s being demolished, but it will be an improvement.”

During tours of the building at the end of last school year, Buchanan said the solid oak and marble inside the building were still in good condition.

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This is a concept drawing of a proposed new walkway and roundabout for the town of Franklin. City officials plan to align the driveway with the new high school and the Franklin Community Park driveway which would be connected by a roundabout to keep traffic on East Sixth Street / Ohio 123. CONTRIBUTION / CITY OF FRANKLIN

This is a concept drawing of a proposed new walkway and roundabout for the town of Franklin.  City officials plan to align the driveway with the new high school and the Franklin Community Park driveway which would be connected by a roundabout to keep traffic on East Sixth Street / Ohio 123. CONTRIBUTION / CITY OF FRANKLIN
legend arrowLegend

This is a concept drawing of a proposed new walkway and roundabout for the town of Franklin. City officials plan to align the driveway with the new high school and the Franklin Community Park driveway which would be connected by a roundabout to keep traffic on East Sixth Street / Ohio 123. CONTRIBUTION / CITY OF FRANKLIN

Local businessman and former Franklin mayor Jim Mears, a 1957 FHS graduate, said it was there he met his future wife and played football and basketball .

“I had a lot of good times as a junior and senior at this school,” he said.

Although the location of the new high school was not his first choice, Mears said the Board of Education and the superintendent had done well with the construction project.

Mears remembers hanging up some crepe paper to help decorate the gym for the ball. He said on the third floor there were doors you could open to look into the auditorium which had a balcony. Mears also remembered being with friends and playing sports there.

“You can’t live yesterday,” he said. “We must move forward in education. The world has become smaller with the advent of computers and children need an education to be competitive in the global market.

Class of 1975 Peggy Darragh-Jeromos went to junior high in the building and went to high school in the East Fourth Street building which opened in 1969.

She said the early days of junior high was a challenge, learning to navigate the multiple floors and building additions after attending elementary school in a one-story building with straight hallways.

legend arrowLegend

On Wednesday, a team from Green City Demolition is working on demolishing the southeast corner of Franklin Junior High School. The century-old building is demolished to make way for the new Franklin High School campus. The demolition should be completed in early January. ED RICHTER / STAFF

On Wednesday, a team from Green City Demolition is working on demolishing the southeast corner of Franklin Junior High School.  The century-old building is demolished to make way for the new Franklin High School campus.  The demolition should be completed in early January.  ED RICHTER / STAFF
legend arrowLegend

On Wednesday, a team from Green City Demolition is working on demolishing the southeast corner of Franklin Junior High School. The century-old building is demolished to make way for the new Franklin High School campus. The demolition should be completed in early January. ED RICHTER / STAFF

“Back then there were wooden desks attached to the floor,” said Darragh-Jeromos, executive director of the Franklin Area Chamber of Commerce. “I loved the acoustics and seating in the auditorium. It was a beautiful space for concerts and plays.

She said the music lessons were held in the old basketball gymnasium which was a pit. The last time Darragh-Jeromos was in the building, she noticed the imprints in the marble of the thousands of shoes that roamed the hallways for a century.

“I’m sad to see it disappear, but I’m glad a new school is coming,” she said.

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